EXHIBITS

Trials and Transitions

(1929-1959)

Providence Incorporation Document

The 1930s, 40s, and 50s were a transitionary period.  Providence became an incorporated city in 1929.[106]  Among other things, incorporation allowed the town to receive “government assistance to install improved water systems.”[107]  This would be especially helpful during the Great Depression.

 

The 1930s were difficult in Providence, as they were elsewhere.  Among the notable events affecting the city’s water supply were the worst drought since the city’s settlement, resulting in the drying up of a water source used by three different companies; an earthquake in 1934; and news that all but four of the culinary companies’ water sources were contaminated.[108]

 

Although there continued to be conflicts among the companies and with the city government, there was also recognition that cooperation was necessary when times were hard.[109]  Peerless Water Works agreed to build a pipeline to allow water to run from its reservoir to the Providence Water Works reservoir.[110]  The city was consulted when water-related health problems revealed themselves.[111]  Most significantly, the city needed the cooperation of the water companies when the town voted to create a municipal water system.[112]

[106] Deposition of Louis Frank, 10 March 1924, Series 20220 Box 9 Folder 9, Lieutenant Governor City and Town Information Files, Utah State Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah, https://images.archives.utah.gov/digital/collection/p17010coll50/id/10807/rec/3; Notice of Result of Providence City Election, 16 July 1929, Series 20220 Box 9 Folder 9, Lieutenant Governor City and Town Information Files, Utah State Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah, https://images.archives.utah.gov/digital/collection/p17010coll50/id/10823/rec/3).
[107] Ricks and Cooley, 137.
[108] Baker, Waters, 42-43.
[109] Baker, Waters, 38.
[110] Baker, Waters, 40.
[111] Baker, Waters, 41.
[112] Baker, Waters, 44-45.